Acting Nuts

This week; Actors Who Leverage Layering

When I work with my students either at NYU, privately, or in my Access to Agents seminars I always work on audition technique and scene study. Often when I venture upon this acting avenue with thespians – viewing what acting skills they have to present – the first foray is just that; presentation. Either the actor plays a singular emotion (“Johnny-one-noting” as I call it) through the entire piece. Or the actor gives me a one dimensional take on the role. When either happens I begin to immediately lose interest. I light-grid. “Light griding” referring to when I zone out at a theater, looking to the light grid, when the action presented on stage has less excitement than watching dead grass grow.

Whenever presentation happens I’m asking, “Where’s the depth? Where are the layers?” The more evolved the choices, the objectives, the twists and turns the more exciting for the viewer watching the actor.

I have two “layer/flavor analogies” that I often provide to an actor when we’re working together once they have fallen into the one dimensional-acting trap.

“Like a potato casserole”, I’ll begin, “with slices of potato both thick and thin layered on top of each other and then covered by a crumbly crust, give me layers within this scene/character.”

When that falls on deaf ears (because God knows potato casserole, a less than palatable  plating, is rarely popular beyond Iowa and parts of Pennsylvania) I go for a better known “food” staple to exhibit my layer/flavor analogy.

“Think of what you’re doing as a Snickers’ bar. You’ve got the nougat, the caramel and the nuts. Those are the layers and flavors. The chocolate that wraps up those flavors is the entire scene itself. What’s inside makes for the content of the scene and character. Play the interior flavors and layers. Give me more choices. More flavor.” Often students give me just the nougat.

The more choices, appropriate to scene, character, motives, objectives and story that an actor provides (without seeming schizophrenic or an actor gone emotionally rouge) the better casting, talent reps. and audience will respond. At worst they’ll think of you as intelligent. At best they’ll think you to be brilliant.

So if you find yourself having trouble with a scene or monologue ask yourself. “Am I playing all the flavors and layers that can be found within this? Or am I just playing the nuts?”

OPPORTUNITY GOING: A side note; this is the last week to sign-up for the few remaining private classes in July under the installment plan of $43.75 per week.

My Best,

Paul

Paul Russell’s career as a casting director, director, acting teacher and former actor has spanned nearly thirty years. He has worked on projects for major film studios, television networks, and Broadway. Paul has taught the business of acting and audition technique at NYU and has spoken at universities including Yale, Temple and the University of the Arts. He writes a column for Back Stage and is the author of ACTING: Make It Your Business – How to Avoid Mistakes and Achieve Success as a Working Actor. For more information, please visit www.PaulRussell.net.

 

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Actor Screw-Ups on Social Networking Sites

This week: Being a Twit on Twitter. A Farce on Facebook. A Loon on LinkedIn and a Moron on MySpace.

“Kevin Kemperer is doin’ Brittany in the hot tub.”

Sadly the only thing fictional about the sentence prior, pulled from a Facebook status, is the user’s name; Kevin Kemperer. His “doin’ Brittany in the hot tub”, whether true or not, was only known to the user who posted the Facebook status and Brittany.

I have a lot of Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and MySpace friends. I’m gigged out by digital detente. About one percent of my computerized companions are 3D friends. I.e. people I actually call friends in the real world. An additional quarter of the techno-byte buddies are people I’ve met or worked with on occasion; acquaintances. Leaving the rest of the 74 percent of the thousands who Friend, Link, Space and Tweet me as strangers who I only know of by their statuses that stream by in a flood on my laptop screen.

Most of that 74 percentile deluge flowed to me. I know it’s not because of my sapphire eyes, curly locks or sexual preference (damn). I know full well that when I confirm or accept the invites from strangers to become a virtual friend that it’s my work as a director, casting director and/or author that’s being exploited. I’m being networked. I have no qualm or complaint about that. That’s part of this business. It’s a vital survival component for success that anyone in any business should constantly be doing. As long as they befriend business buddies in a professional manner.

If you’re going to network on social internet sites you would do yourself a professional service by creating two profiles. One for your true friends and family. Another to represent your career. Keep your contacts separate and relative for each profile.

I’m often amused and remain amazed about the number of inappropriate “statuses” streaming on my news feeds from the people who are using me as a professional networking connection. Some things are never meant to be witnessed. Like Rush Limbaugh repeatedly jumping naked on a bed.

Below is a sampling from a recent quick glance of actor Facebook & Twitter statuses better left un-texted. If you recognize any of them you can thank me for not revealing your name which I have replaced with “Anonymous”.

“Anonymous fuck my life.”

“Anonymous ain’t gonna go and act a fool and be the lead story on the nigga news? Neva me sucka, I’ll never be your lover, I’D RATHER MAKE YOU SUFFER. You stupid motherfucker.”

“Anonymous thinks there is nothing better than belting out songs that make the neighbors want to complain!”

“Anonymous is burnt as a lobster and totally depressed as hell that CHANDLER has left her forever (crying of course)”

“Anonymous is extremely frustrated…”

“Anonymous’ back is surprisingly tight after yesterdays climbing, and longing for a back massage”

“Anonymous’ headache is gone and I cleaned my own bathroom like a big girl.”

“Anonymous is not good at this hope thing, but desperately needs to know so she can move on with her life. So the question is to act or not? Will either choice help for the better or worse? Or has fate already decided? Really… this is torture!”

“Anonymous has never been so humiliated by someone who calls her his best friend”

“Anonymous is generally displeased.”

“Anonymous is Dear BestBuy, thanks for ruining my fucking day by accusing me of being a criminal. WHY WOULD I TRY TO SHOP LIFT A 5 DOLLAR DVD!?!?!?!?!?!

TMI folks (too much interconnection). O.K. and too much information for me and other people you’re networking with professionally to know. Way too much.

The current constant connection fad of passive aggressive communication via keystrokes is in overdrive. Online social networks can be great tools (of which a later blog on successful exploitation will be forthcoming). But for now; the lesson here is to keep your private thoughts just that. Private. With possible exceptions contained to family relations and reality friends.

If you still doubt about blindly proliferating inappropriate prose to the masses think about this. If you were applying for a school, employment at a Fortune 500 company or keeping in contact with your grandparents via a social internet web site would you advertise to them and the world you were “doing Brittany in the hot tub”? If so, then you’re narcissism challenges that of Paris Hilton’s. Get offline. Get help.

SPECIAL NOTE: You’re probably smarter than the actors above. Be even smarter: Get special discounted, $$ saving, career/marketing-make overs/audition technique coaching (PRIVATE One-on-One) which is now registering with a special installment plan if you enroll for July prior to 6/26. Details at PaulRussell.net

My Best,

Paul

Paul Russell’s career as a casting director, director, acting teacher and former actor has spanned nearly thirty years. He has worked on projects for major film studios, television networks, and Broadway. Paul has taught the business of acting and audition technique at NYU and has spoken at universities including Yale, Temple and the University of the Arts. He writes a column for Back Stage and is the author of ACTING: Make It Your Business – How to Avoid Mistakes and Achieve Success as a Working Actor. For more information, please visit www.PaulRussell.net.

 

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Actor Email Addresses

This week: Actor Email Addresses Used in Addressing Entertainment Professionals

The pre-pubescent use of sexually suggestive, “personality expressive”, childish monikers misused and abused in e-mail addresses utilized for business correspondence has got to stop. Now. If you’ve read my book you know that I stress “this industry is all about image, image, image…” That’s not a mirror mantra for the narcissistic. It’s a reality of the entertainment industry.

Often as I go through the actor mail (hard copy and digital) I groan or sigh heavily in disbelief as I come across actors seeking professional work from a casting person or representation by an agent while utilizing e-mail addresses that are in no way professional.

Below is just a small sampling from the saturation of sophomoric e-mail addresses that I’ve found on actor resumes or spammed to my in-box. In order to spare these fools of flippant font further shame and protect the sillies from spam; the servers (Yahoo, Gmail, Hotmail, etc) have been removed.

dirtyprettyone2000 (The video prequel to nastynaughtyone2001?)

chinkychinese (Does this person have a severe case of self-loathing or are they utilizing  the addy as a dating advert to rice queens?)

AnnoyinActress

swishyfishy

foolishactor (Yes. Your e-mail address proves the message.)

instantactor (Just add bottled water!)

danceweasel (Shirtless, twitching twinks-with-drinks in hand comes to mind.)

puzled.one (If you can’t spell “puzzled”; yes… indeed, you are “puzled”.)

Grahammy_poo (Let’s not even envision to where this double entendre could lead.)

And….

pussylvr

Really? Are these people kidding or are they just insane, myopic morons? This is a business folks. A profession. If the e-mail address in use for your professional correspondence resembles a fifth grader’s ha-ha quotient (i.e. fart jokes and school yard nicknames) then I and others who hire will not take you seriously. Seriously.

For any professional, electronic correspondence an actor’s e-mail address should include the performer’s name or part of it. Such as:

NormaDesmond@whatever.com

N.Desmond@whatever.com

Norma_D@whatever.com

“IngénueForLife”, “MyManMax” or “IamBig” would not be appropriate, professional, e-mail address monikers for Ms. Desmond. (And if you’re wondering who Norma Desmond is… please hand in your acting and/or gay card. Now.)

Keep the silly and inane e-mail addys for friends and family who may be more forgiving than a business contact. Leverage your electronic loony-ness with them. Put a professional, digital image to your e-mail address when addressing professionals. Got it danceweasel? Good.

‘Nuff said.

AMIYB_AmazonRead advice from legendary talent agents,
plus Hollywood & Broadway actors in Paul Russell’s Best-Selling Book ACTING: Make It Your Business!

Paul Russell’s career as a casting director, director, acting teacher and former actor has spanned nearly thirty years. He has worked on projects for major film studios, television networks, and Broadway. Paul has taught the business of acting and audition technique at NYU and has spoken at universities including Yale, Temple and the University of the Arts. He writes a column for Back Stage and is the author of ACTING: Make It Your Business – How to Avoid Mistakes and Achieve Success as a Working Actor. For more information, please visit www.PaulRussell.net.

 

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Sex Behind The Scenes – Actors Dating Actors

Sex: It’s the entertainment of nearly anyone involved in entertainment. It’s our hobby. If you haven’t dabbled in the backstage intrigue that is showmance, you’re either smart, a reticent recluse, or harboring halitosis that steers colleagues a good 10 feet away from your path.

 sex behind the scenes

Paul Russell_HeadshotPaul Russell
PaulRussell.net

Ssex and actors

Showmance.

It isn’t one’s love for the latest stage hit that has developed a cult-following accompanied by a marketing campaign that includes relentless merchandising of the show on T-shirts and towels. But it’s similar to what happens between two emotionally and romantically charged people involved in a show who are attracted and then collide. And sometimes even an airbag or condom can’t provide safety.

First of all, in full disclosure, I must admit that I am not unblemished when it comes to my past sex life (no comment on the present). So no morality play here. My last showmance was over 20 years ago. It has continued ever since with my partner who I met during a national tour of “Annie” (o.k. … stop the giggles).

Sex: It’s the entertainment of nearly anyone involved in entertainment. It’s our hobby. If you haven’t dabbled in the backstage intrigue that is showmance, you’re either smart, a reticent recluse, or harboring halitosis that steers colleagues a good 10 feet away from your path.

Now why, you may be pondering, am I writing here about a sometimes salacious subject when this column is about acting and casting? Because relationships — especially intimate, when mingled with business — matter. There’s great importance of image integrity needed over intimacy when engaging in, maintaining or separating from a showmance. Your career can be greatly affected.

There’s an anecdotal punchline that’s runs rampant and rings true in our business of show: “There are only six people working in this business.” Our community, while large in hopefuls, is very small when it comes to actual participants. Rumor and “adjusted facts” are spread in our club of creatives with as much ferocity as tabloids that target a celebrity for something salacious.

You have got to be mindful of how your romantic endeavors — either sincere or temporary — are seen by others with whom you work. As I’ve written in my book, this industry is all about image, image, and image. That goes for participants on both sides of the curtain.

And it’s not only image that one must be mindful of when courting a fellow company member. Take in account how your relationship will affect the project and your peers. I worked at one summer stock company where each season the less-than-reputable producer routinely chose a chorus girl to be his behind-the-scenes playmate. One of which he married and soon thereafter divorced. Others became pregnant out of wedlock. With each fling that was flung, the company focused on generating rumors about the relationship(s). Eventually the producer’s attention of amore was ostracized. Company cohesiveness exited stage right and never came back for a curtain call.

I’m not advocating for or against following the heart or libido while you work. That’s your path to follow or ignore. Just know that outside influences (co-workers and employers) can cause action that will inhibit your new partnering and, more importantly, the design of original intent: work.

Showmance Caveats

1. Gossip

Apart from politics and tabloids, nowhere else other than in entertainment is rumor ravaging of others a joyful pursuit for those who have little substance in their own lives. If you begin any relationship, sexual or romantic (and yes there are differences between the two), you and your partner(s) would do best to keep the relationship out of sight from others. As a director, casting director and former actor, I have seen many, many companies become divided because of inter-cast/staff romances. Jealousies and alliances form. Be discrete for the success of both the relationship (or tryst) and the project.

2. Producers

Some producers, particularly among the non-union theaters, have an unspoken “morality meter” they mentally mind for their employees. They prefer that the people in their hire not utilize the workplace provided as a supermarket for sex. Keep your intimate relations far from producers. At least until a wedding or commitment ceremony; then hit them with your registry list. Producers tend to have more money than you and your out-of-suitcase peers.

Even if you believe your mating manners in a company are not excessive or are above honor, still keep it from producers and creatives who hire. At least those who are not close friends of yours. If the intimate mingling is with a producer or creative, then you really want to keep your relationship quiet. At least until you have to invite guests to the wedding/commitment ceremony. We can be jealous, bitter bitches when snubbed.

3. The Heart

For the newbies to the business and the veteran idealists (both of which I was long ago), ground yourself. Sex does not equal love. Love does not equal sex.

What intimate relations that may develop in the heightened emotional state of collaboration may not have happened elsewhere. The atmosphere of working and/or living close under stresses and adrenaline may spur attractions and situations that you would not normally follow in the “real world.”

From long ago I recall sitting in the living room of Shawnee Playhouse’s cast house as two infatuates of each other were snuggling on a couch across from me. The young lady was very much enthralled with her new beau. Then came the cold water statement from him to her: “Don’t get too cozy, honey. I’m not here for long.” Ouch. That romantically reticent actor later got his own TV series and several Spielberg films. The actress? A lost casualty of the business.

Sometimes show romances live beyond the show. Often they’re just that: show romances. Either way, go with some common sense, respect for others, and discretion. Enjoy discoveries. Carry condoms. (Some folks have on-hand assorted-sized engagement rings.)

My best,
Paul

PaulRussell.net

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Paul Russell’s career as a casting director, director, acting teacher and former actor has spanned thirty years. He has worked on projects for major film studios, television networks, and Broadway. Paul has taught the business of acting and audition technique at NYU and has spoken at universities including Yale, Temple and the University of the Arts. He is the author of ACTING: Make It Your Business – How to Avoid Mistakes and Achieve Success as a Working Actor. For more information, please visit www.PaulRussell.net.

Casting Directors, Talent Agents, Directors & Actors

Love Paul Russell’s Best-Selling Book for Actors
ACTING: Make It Your Business!

 

Actors everywhere who are trying to succeed in the business, young or old, on stage or on camera, anywhere in the world, take note:

This is your roadmap!”
BERNARD TELSEY, casting director, CSA
(Hamilton, The Intern, NBC’s The Wiz – LIVE!, Into The Woods – The Movie, Wicked)
All the right questions asked and answered…
and with a generous portion of good humor.”
SUZANNE RYAN, casting director, CSA
(Law & OrderUnforgettable)

 

“I love this book!
Paul’s book tells you what you don’t want to hear but really need to know
EVERY actor should read this book!”
DIANE RILEY, Senior Legit Talent Agent
Harden-Curtis & Associates

 

“Paul’s book made me proud to be a part of this community we call ‘show!'”
KAREN ZIEMBA, TONY & Drama Desk Award Winning Actress

 

“Paul Russell’s words are not only blunt & accurate they zero in on all the questions every actor wants to know but is afraid to ask!”
KEN MELAMED, Talent Agency Partner
Bret Adams, Ltd.

 

“I had my Business of Acting, BFA Seniors, class do book reports on a variety of “business of acting” books and ACTING: Make It Your Business came out a clear winner—considered to be essential for their bookshelves!
Dr. NINA LeNOIR,
Dept. Chair – Dept. of Thtr.
Chapman University

 

Get smarter on the business of acting from legendary Hollywood & Broadway actors and talent agents in a casting director Paul Russell’s Best-Selling Book ACTING:AMIYB_Amazon Make It Your Business!

Best Time of Year for Finding a Talent Agent

This week: Timing; Finding a talent agent / Changing talent agencies

Talent AgencyWhen is the best time of year for seeking an agent?

Before and after pilot season. And…the summer.

Casting will have slightly slowed to episodics, films, Broadway and regional theater. Agents are freer to explore expanding their client lists. Agents are also cleaning their client lists during summer; dropping actors who have a history of:

– Being high-maintenance

– Not returning emails, texts, and or calls regarding audition appointments

– Under-performing (i.e. call-back ratio is low, actor doesn’t book jobs that are commisionable)

During this sluggish semester agents, aside from sitting at their desks surfing the web, are seeking new clients while dumping troubled  and lackluster clients. June to July’s end is the best time for anyone without representation (or represented actors seeking a change) to seek their champion.

Early to mid-summer is the time of year when agents have time on their hands – which is often taken up by anxious clients asking their reps, “Where are my auditions?” You would think these inquiring actors would know that year-after-year this is hibernation season for casting. It’s cyclical folks.

Agents are more receptive to taking on new clients before the hustle of pitching for projects picks up again in late July, mid-August. There’s no better time of year for seeking an agent, fully prepared with an effective audition, revamped marketing materials and honed interview skills.

My best,
Paul

AMIYB_AmazonRead advice from legendary talent agents,
plus Hollywood & Broadway actors in Paul Russell’s Best-Selling Book ACTING: Make It Your Business!

Paul Russell’s career as a casting director, director, acting teacher and former actor has spanned nearly thirty years. He has worked on projects for major film studios, television networks, and Broadway. Paul has taught the business of acting and audition technique at NYU and has spoken at universities including Yale, Temple and the University of the Arts. He writes a column for Back Stage and is the author of ACTING: Make It Your Business – How to Avoid Mistakes and Achieve Success as a Working Actor. For more information, please visit www.PaulRussell.net.

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ACTING: Make It Your Business

Acting Techniques & Teachers

This Week: Worshiping a Technique and/or Teacher (a.k.a. The Cult Factor)

“Everything I say is right.

Everything I say is wrong.

There are many conflicting opinions in this industry. Don’t take one person’s word as gospel. Including my own. Take what works for you.”
– Paul Russell

Anyone who has read my book ACTING: Make It Your Business will recognize that quote of mine. It’s on the first page.

Recently I was teaching at one of the schools that I was invited to. (Possibly dangerous having me corrupt the minds of young actors.) We were working on audition technique. We began with the dinosaur of auditions; monologues.

The first student, while doing her monologue, stood with her feet as if glued to the floor. She would give an occasional gesture and then ended the piece with the word “scene”.

My reaction: “What the fuck?!”

I began to work with the student, telling her that in the professional world of auditions, actors can use the space and not be so regimented or worse; manufactured as she had been. Plus only green actors and amateurs say “scene” at the end of an audition.

To all of this the class gasped. Then came looks of confusion. Fear. Followed by students looking uneasily at each other. As if I had just said the vilest defamation against each of their mothers.

I asked what was wrong. Sheepishly they began to reply that they had been taught the complete opposite. A fellow teacher of the school had instructed them to stay “in a box”. If a move or gesture was needed it was to always be matched with a singular word or phrase each time they recited the monologue. And the actor was to have a set number of moves and gestures per monologue.

“You’ve got to be fucking kidding me,” is what shot out of my mouth.

Are they actors or puppets?

Not only was this plastic-acting being taught to a number of classes, year-after-year, at this institution; the teacher like me, has set these instructions for acting in a popular book. The book and the teacher I later learned have developed a large following which is nearly cult like. Oh my God.

There was a community theater producer who wrote a book on directing (there’s a dangerous mix). When I was investigating publishers for my book, I flipped through the pages of this director primer. The community theater Presario-author was advising aspiring directors, who may be asked to direct regionally a show that previously was on Broadway, to replicate the original New York production!  He instructs that they should not “tinker with what worked” for Broadway. So much for original thought. Young directors reading that book have been terribly misguided.

I once worked for this person. I wasn’t surprised about what I read because when I was asked to direct a show at his facility he handed me a bootleg video tape from the national tour of the show and asked that I replicate what was on the illegal documentation.  I refused. As an SDC director and by law I, and other directors, can not legally replicate the work of another director unless granted permission by that director.

You, as an artist and person, must use what bits of knowledge you pick up on your journey. Either exploit or discard the large volume of “This is how it’s done”’s that hurtle your way.

I’m fucking sick-and-tired of hearing the phrase “People say it should be done this way.” Really? Herd mentality rules? I don’t think so. If you believe in following the masses look at what it did for this country over the past eight years of the Bush administration.

As one of the actors interviewed in ACTING: Make It Your Business said; “There is no right or wrong way. If there were someone would write a book and make a ton of money.”

She’s right. All around. You must take what works for you.

Now you may be thinking; “But Paul, you’re giving advice now.” Yes, I am. And it’s based on my opinion. Most advice is just that. A conclusion formulated by personal experience and observation.

Don’t become cult-ish with any acting teacher, coach or author. I appreciate the tons of praise and compliments received for my musings here and in my book but I fear the day when I overhear someone say; “But Paul Russell said it has to be done this way.” It has to be done THAT way only if it works for you. Let others discover what works for them.

My best,
Paul

AMIYB_AmazonRead advice from legendary talent agents,
plus Hollywood & Broadway actors in Paul Russell’s Best-Selling Book ACTING: Make It Your Business!

Paul Russell’s career as a casting director, director, acting teacher and former actor has spanned nearly thirty years. He has worked on projects for major film studios, television networks, and Broadway. Paul has taught the business of acting and audition technique at NYU and has spoken at universities including Yale, Temple and the University of the Arts. He writes a column for Back Stage and is the author of ACTING: Make It Your Business – How to Avoid Mistakes and Achieve Success as a Working Actor. For more information, please visit www.PaulRussell.net.

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Innovative Marketing Tool for The Actor

This week: An untapped marketing tool for actors

I’m surprised this hasn’t been utilized by actors… when it comes to marketing and hustling to get work; the smarter actors tend to lead.

In my thirty year career as a director, casting director and former actor I have never once come across an actor (including my past self) who had a reduced, easy-to-pocket, up-to-date resume on them at all times.

As I wrote earlier on this blog, there have been many occasions when I encountered actors who had no form of a picture & resume (i.e. their business card) with them. I’m not talking about just at auditions (though actors without a P&R while in the job search mode in not uncommon). I’m offering a solution to those who foolishly go without their P&R for whatever reason, including “it’s to big to handle”. To be an actor without some form of a picture & resume with you at all times is poor business practice, asinine and laziness.

So how to create and carry a miniature P&R to pocket in your pocket, purse or over-sized wallet? Two ways:

OPTION 1:

Know those postcards that you have of your puss? The ones other actors send out to say “Hi, my cat’s in heat and so is my career!” Well keep your puss on the front and drop the backside update about your pussy.

1. Order a set of postcards with your picture, name, phone & e-mail on the front. On the back leave the postcard blank. Order either standard size (4 x 6 inches) or oversized (5.5 x 8.5 inches) postcards.

2. Then you’ll need labels. What kind of labels? I’ve already done your homework for you.

For standard size postcards you’ll need Avery 8464 (3-1/3 x 4 inches) or another brand that is similar in size. If you can find a larger size that will fit without needing to be trimmed; great.

For oversized postcards you’ll need Avery 8165 (5.5 x 8.5 inches) or another brand of the same size.

3. Simply reduce your resume to the label size that you have chosen. If you cant’ fit your full resume on the label then edit waste and keep the best of the resume on the label.

INCLUDE a note that your full resume can be viewed at your web site. Don’t have a web site? Bad actor – 5 demerits.

4. Then in a small quantity put the printed labels on the back of your postcards. When you need to update your resume, reprint your labels and put on to another set of blank headshot postcards.

OPTION 2:

An alternative to having backside-blank-headshot-postcards would be to use a service like Vista Print (I use them for my marketing-whore materials), PostCards.com, ImageMedia or whomever you find on or offline that offers the best value and quality. With one of these services you can then have both your headshot and resume formatted and pre-printed to be on the respective front/back of your post card.

The down side to this is that you have to order a large volume and being that the resume information is pre-printed you can’t update information until your next print run.

The pro to having your reduced, postcard size picture and resume pre-printed is that it’ll look cleaner IF you formatted properly when ordering.

###

So there ya have it. I have yet to ever receive something like this from an actor. Ever. Receiving regular business cards with just a picture…? I’ve gotten tons that go into the trash. They tell me nothing of the actor’s history. Having postcards tossed onto my desk with invites to showcases or include pet updates….? Far too many and they too go into the trash because they also tell me nothing about the actor.

Give this a try. You’ll be viewed as innovative. Believe me not many people lead when given new ideas. Also you’ll be able to carry your headshot and resume everywhere you go. Everywhere (well maybe not to a clothing optional campground). Far too many actors have I run into at airports, on the street, at openings, or elsewhere and they didn’t have information to offer me that was useful, i.e. their picture and resume in a reduced form for BOTH of us to easily carry.

On a side note: Joel Carlton of DGRW (a bicoastal agency), Judy Boals, President of Boals Talent and Michael Rodriquez of The Roster are the guest agents for the next agent panel for Access to Agents. This is a four-week seminar intensive that prepares and introduces you to the people who help you find work. Plus you get a marketing make-over AND written feedback from the agents (and hopefully and invite to become a client). For registration visit: http://paulrussell.net/Access_to_Agents.html

My Best,

Paul

Paul Russell’s career as a casting director, director, acting teacher and former actor has spanned nearly thirty years. He has worked on projects for major film studios, television networks, and Broadway. Paul has taught the business of acting and audition technique at NYU and has spoken at universities including Yale, Temple and the University of the Arts. He writes a column for Back Stage and is the author of ACTING: Make It Your Business – How to Avoid Mistakes and Achieve Success as a Working Actor. For more information, please visit www.PaulRussell.net.

 

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