Actors Effectively Using Social Media

This week: Modern Actor Marketing via a Modem

I found a wonderful status on Facebook recently:

“Christopher Stadulis TODAY – Auditioning for a role on Law & Order: SVU & auditioning with CD Jamie Schulman (Jen Euston Casting) & CD Jessica Kelly (Chrystie Street Casting) THURSDAY – auditioning with Agent Holly Vegter (Hartig-Hilepo Agency)”

One day later it was followed by an updated status:

“Christopher Stadulis got a callback for L&O:SVU! Just finished auditioning with CD Jonathan Strauss who loved my work. He wants me to go back today @ 4:15 to audition with the Director of this episode of L&O:SVU. Then I will be meeting & auditioning with CD’s Jessica Kelly (Chrystie Street Casting) & Jamie Schulman (Jen Euston Casting).”

Finally! An actor, among the thousands who have friended me as a “networking receptacle” using their Facebook status for something other than telling me:

  • My cat is in heat and so am I.
  • I hate life and people. You should too!
  • I just took this quiz to find out that my personality for religious sects is: Amish.

People (i.e. bitter career-barren-actors) have written nasty notes to me that I utilize Facebook as a marketing tool for my book ACTING: Make It Your Business and for my classes. My reply? “Why, yes. Yes, I do. I’m also marketing my career as both a director and casting director and dispensing casting and career information at no cost to actors. Got a problem with that?”

And here’s something I don’t openly share (until now); I’m not thrilled with having to be a self-described “marketing whore” but when it comes to survival we all have to have a bit of the selling slut in each of us. Online social networks have become a modern medium for everyone to sell their wares with the least amount of cost for the most return.

As I replied to a mean-spirited missive from one actor (I’ve never met) who friended me to market himself:

“Facebook is a marketing tool for all. Know that our office daily receives inquiries and requests from actors to attend their shows (often at a cost to us), seek representation (of which we do not do since we are not an agency), provide employment (of which we’re happy to offer access if the actor is avail., willing and correct for a project).”

What I really wanted to reply was, “You friended me. Stop bitching and market yourself.”

In my classes I often instruct my students to watch what I do on Facebook, Twitter and MySpace and excel past me. Some do. Others remain timid. It’s timidity that keeps one from advancing.

Joining a Facebook or MySpace group that is administered by a casting office, producer, director, theater or an actor collective is not actively marketing oneself. It’s passive and lazy. Friending same and expecting the person you networked to suddenly look upon you as brilliant for your talent just because you’re on their friend list will garner the similar response; electronic crickets.

Like Christopher Stadulis, put in your status something of use. Provide career advancing information to the person(s) you’re networking. Let the people from whom you want notice know that others are noticing you for your talents and/or achievements.

I recently had a student who exploited Facebook well with the release of his film The Graduates. For weeks he would put in his status, links to trailers for the film plus announce screenings and praise for his performance. A few of his friends may have tired of the promotion but what kind of friends were they if they didn’t support and encourage his achievement?

If you’ve joined an online social network you should be seeking out directors, writers, producers, agents and casting directors. And not just the household/industry name names… go for the up-and-comers. They’re the ones who need you as much you need them. Find industry people who have friends in common with you. Strangers are more apt to electronically accept a virtual friend if they see there are a number of mutual friends between themselves and the person inviting the online friendship. They’ll ignore the ignore button for fear that they may offend someone whom they may have met but can’t recall. It’s that fear, doubt and potential for embarrassment that is the Achilles heel to a stranger’s friend list.

If you’re not comfortable with networking online. That’s O.K. You’re leaving open vacancies to be filled. Thousands of other people are taking your place and their fearlessness to network is putting them ahead of you in this journey that is life.

I’ll be the first to admit that I hate promoting myself. Always have and probably forever will. But I’ve learned to deal with my squeamishness of selling out of necessity (medical bills, rent, food, etc). If I didn’t get a reality check I wouldn’t have worked on Broadway, wouldn’t have done films for 20th Century Fox, gone would be my directing credits, and never would my book have been published by Random House. I also would not have been able to share my insights here with you. My fear would have left my life empty. And it did for awhile at the beginning of my career to which I have great regret. What I missed can never be recovered. For I’ll never know what opportunities I let pass me by for my being passive.

The choice is yours. Use effectively the social network tools provided. Or ignore them and they’ll ignore you.

My best,
Paul

AMIYB_AmazonRead advice from legendary talent agents,
plus Hollywood & Broadway actors in Paul Russell’s Best-Selling Book ACTING: Make It Your Business!

Paul Russell’s career as a casting director, director, acting teacher and former actor has spanned nearly thirty years. He has worked on projects for major film studios, television networks, and Broadway. Paul has taught the business of acting and audition technique at NYU and has spoken at universities including Yale, Temple and the University of the Arts. He writes a column for Back Stage and is the author of ACTING: Make It Your Business – How to Avoid Mistakes and Achieve Success as a Working Actor. For more information, please visit www.PaulRussell.net.

 

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A Pass on Passing

This week: “The road you didn’t take hardly comes to mind… does it?”

My recent auditions-by-appointment for the Barter Theatre were a cause for celebration and sad reflection. The reason for this double-edged casting sword? George W. Bush.

For the first time, ever since I began casting nearly two decades ago, not one actor passed on an audition-by-appointment for lack of interest. None. Nada. Zip. I’ve been involved with casting for Broadway, major film studios, television projects and regional theater and always the actor pass rate averages 1 to 2 percent per project. Actors pass on the opportunity to audition for reasons ranging from; they didn’t want to work, didn’t like the project or they were just being flakes. The latter a far too common ailment within this business (on either side of the table).

So here I was. Finally having all appointments called out and given a one hundred percent confirm rate by agents. I wish I could celebrate. But how can one celebrate desperation brought upon by what I refer to our present economy as the Bush Legacy.

I find it sad that fear has caused actors to do their job. Accept auditions for which they are available. The offer of potential work being passed upon by actors has always pissed me off. I never understood the mentality. Especially among the represented thespian set who pass on an opportunity that may bring new career connections, an additional credit on the resume, exposure and oh… yes, a paycheck.

When actors in the past would pass on a paying project of mine I took it personally (I’ve been accused of being too sensitive and if you tell anyone, I’ll slap you silly).  But yes, I’ve been dejected for being rejected. I soon got over myself. I wasn’t being rejected. The passing, available actors were refusing an opportunity by being short-sighted, lazy or both. They were hurting their careers, not mine. And while I no longer take passes personal I won’t deny that I do get a bit of “I-told-you-so” satisfaction when I run into an unemployed actor who passed on one of my projects that is either in rehearsal or production when our run-in happens.

Karma and a gay man can both be bitches.

To those not represented who read this blog, all this may seem unbelievable that actors pass on opportunities of paid employment within their chosen profession (and by paid, I mean a living wage). I thought so too when I was an actor. But it happens. Often. And more so as actors believe themselves to be a bigger name than they really are within the industry. Now those same big-headed actors are begging to take regional theater or day player jobs. Just goes to show that survival will make one do the most sensible of choices.

I’m delighted that no one passed on the recent appointments. I’m not at all thrilled that George W. Bush and Wall Street brought reason to what should be normal; actors willing to accept opportunities for employment. Maybe my father, a devout Republican actually is right in being Right. Oh good God no. Next!

Post Script: I cursed myself. Damn it. After years at this game of entertainment I know better than to announce or write about anything  until final curtain or paycheck; whichever comes first.

I wrote the above blog weeks ago, the weekend prior to going into auditions. On my voice mail the night before the auditions were messages that three actors canceled their confirmed appointments. Each, through their individual representation, gave the same reason for backing out at the last minute; they wanted to stay in town (i.e. NY) for potential projects that may come up. Really?! In the dead of summer? The most activity in July and August in a NY casting office is an intern taking an hour to open five actor submissions (interns seem to loose all cogitative skills when challenged with opening actor mail).

O.K. let’s look past my being peeved at being left with three holes in my schedule. Those three coveted slots (competition and time was tight) could have gone to three actors I had on my hold list.  But the passes came too late. At this moment there could be an unemployed actor out there who could have been seen in one of those slots and who aced the audition and would now have gainful employment for the next few months (plus health insurance weeks). To that unknown, thank your passing, procrastinating  peers for an opportunity lost.

So, the record remains unbroken. Hundreds upon hundreds of projects I’ve cast from film to TV to Broadway to regional theater and not one of those projects went without at least one person passing. Grrrrrrrr.

Actors desperate for work? Ha! I sometimes muse if that’s a myth.

[The LAST July One-on-One Career & Audition Technique Coaching begins this week. Get it before someone else does @ Classes.]

My Best,

Paul
Paul Russell Casting
SDC Director | Author, ACTING: Make It Your Business
http://www.PaulRussell.net

 

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Actor Do’s & Don’t’s

This week: Image & marketing tips for actors via video.

prclogolrgPaul is away on vacation fending off bears in the woods. Below is a nine minute clip from a half-hour television interview that aired earlier. Paul talks about how do’s and don’t’s for actor auditioning and marketing.

Paul’s blunt log returns next week with new content.

 

 

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The Cardinal Sin of Auditioning

This week:  Deceitful Actors Who Falsely Audition

Recently as I was sitting in my partner’s office (the talent agency owner) I overheard one side of a heated phone conversation between one of the agents and a client.

“If you go in for Tara Rubin for this audition, just to be seen, without any intent on accepting an offer for the national tour of Young Frankenstein should it come your way…” was how the conversation began as the agent’s temporal veins began to pulse. I knew where this was going. And it wouldn’t be pretty.

Here was an actor, with solid representation, at a better agency, who’d been given an offer for a job in New York which would conflict with the Young Frankenstein national tour. Because he had an offer on hand which was not finalized on paper, auditioning for other projects is the norm in the industry. What is not the appropriate norm was what he wanted to do. He was telling his agent, someone in the business long before said actor was in diapers, that if he got an offer from the Young Frankenstein audition, he would pass. I.e. flip off the offer and creative team. His sole desire to go in for one of the hottest casting offices in New York was that he wanted to use the audition to remind Tara Rubin that he existed.

W.T.F! Excuse me????!!!!!

As the conversation to my left continued, the agent’s pulsating temples were joined in rhythm by her click-clack tapping of manicured finger nails upon the frosted glass of her desk top. I looked to her boss, my partner. He informed me that the actor on the phone was the same young man who came into an audition for me over a year ago, got an offer from my office and client and then passed. He passed because he never wanted the job. He auditioned only because he had yet to be seen by me. He did THIS to a casting director who also was the life-partner to the agent that represented him! (Can anyone say Gaul? Stupidity? Walking selfish-arrogant-anal opening?!)

My partner and I were both supremely peeved. Despite the actor’s foible of giving what basically was a fictitious audition (because he held no truth to professionalism) this “actor” wasn’t dropped. His punishment to date? I refuse to call him in for anything again. Ever.

Never. Repeat. Never. Ever do you as an actor, a professional, go to an audition knowing that you will not accept an offer should you be so lucky as to receive one. As I wrote extensively on this subject in ACTING: Make It Your Business far too many times do actors and academics of the profession live by or impart unto others the mis-informed, moronic mantra, “You should audition for anything and everything even if you’re not right for a role, not available for, or dis-interested in the project being cast.” If you’re not; interested, right for a role or project available, DO NOT AUDITION! Got it?!

You’re wasting the time of your fellow actors who DO want the job and are appropriate for the role(s) being cast. By being false with your audition intent you’re wasting the valuable time and money of the creative personnel who are seeking performers who want immediate employment. Plus, you’re pissing off your peers and the people who hire. Actors and acting academics who believe in the “audition for anything and everything” fable can argue with me and my casting colleagues, talent reps., producers and directors against our professional opinion until they and their tenured professors enroll for the grave. Fine. But you and they should know this: Participate in the foolish, selfish, unprofessional behavior and an early grave is where your career journey prematurely comes to an end with those you practice upon this folly.

You may be thinking…, “How would the casting people, directors or producers know I was auditioning for a project that I had no intent on taking the job if offered?” Hmmmm. Deceit can not hide forever.

In ACTING: Make It Your Business I wrote of an incident in which one rude, selfish, arrogant, asinine actress who auditioned for one of my projects knew going into the audition studio that she would not take the job if offered. What happened? How I knew? What became of her? And what happened when I ran into her afterward…? Well for those who have read that story… you know. And hopefully you’ve learned from her error.

My best,
Paul

AMIYB_AmazonRead advice from legendary talent agents,
plus Hollywood & Broadway actors in Paul Russell’s Best-Selling Book ACTING: Make It Your Business!

 

Paul Russell’s career as a casting director, director, acting teacher and former actor has spanned nearly thirty years. He has worked on projects for major film studios, television networks, and Broadway. Paul has taught the business of acting and audition technique at NYU and has spoken at universities including Yale, Temple and the University of the Arts. He writes a column for Back Stage and is the author of ACTING: Make It Your Business – How to Avoid Mistakes and Achieve Success as a Working Actor. For more information, please visit www.PaulRussell.net.

 

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Acting Nuts

This week; Actors Who Leverage Layering

When I work with my students either at NYU, privately, or in my Access to Agents seminars I always work on audition technique and scene study. Often when I venture upon this acting avenue with thespians – viewing what acting skills they have to present – the first foray is just that; presentation. Either the actor plays a singular emotion (“Johnny-one-noting” as I call it) through the entire piece. Or the actor gives me a one dimensional take on the role. When either happens I begin to immediately lose interest. I light-grid. “Light griding” referring to when I zone out at a theater, looking to the light grid, when the action presented on stage has less excitement than watching dead grass grow.

Whenever presentation happens I’m asking, “Where’s the depth? Where are the layers?” The more evolved the choices, the objectives, the twists and turns the more exciting for the viewer watching the actor.

I have two “layer/flavor analogies” that I often provide to an actor when we’re working together once they have fallen into the one dimensional-acting trap.

“Like a potato casserole”, I’ll begin, “with slices of potato both thick and thin layered on top of each other and then covered by a crumbly crust, give me layers within this scene/character.”

When that falls on deaf ears (because God knows potato casserole, a less than palatable  plating, is rarely popular beyond Iowa and parts of Pennsylvania) I go for a better known “food” staple to exhibit my layer/flavor analogy.

“Think of what you’re doing as a Snickers’ bar. You’ve got the nougat, the caramel and the nuts. Those are the layers and flavors. The chocolate that wraps up those flavors is the entire scene itself. What’s inside makes for the content of the scene and character. Play the interior flavors and layers. Give me more choices. More flavor.” Often students give me just the nougat.

The more choices, appropriate to scene, character, motives, objectives and story that an actor provides (without seeming schizophrenic or an actor gone emotionally rouge) the better casting, talent reps. and audience will respond. At worst they’ll think of you as intelligent. At best they’ll think you to be brilliant.

So if you find yourself having trouble with a scene or monologue ask yourself. “Am I playing all the flavors and layers that can be found within this? Or am I just playing the nuts?”

OPPORTUNITY GOING: A side note; this is the last week to sign-up for the few remaining private classes in July under the installment plan of $43.75 per week.

My Best,

Paul

Paul Russell’s career as a casting director, director, acting teacher and former actor has spanned nearly thirty years. He has worked on projects for major film studios, television networks, and Broadway. Paul has taught the business of acting and audition technique at NYU and has spoken at universities including Yale, Temple and the University of the Arts. He writes a column for Back Stage and is the author of ACTING: Make It Your Business – How to Avoid Mistakes and Achieve Success as a Working Actor. For more information, please visit www.PaulRussell.net.

 

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Actor Screw-Ups on Social Networking Sites

This week: Being a Twit on Twitter. A Farce on Facebook. A Loon on LinkedIn and a Moron on MySpace.

“Kevin Kemperer is doin’ Brittany in the hot tub.”

Sadly the only thing fictional about the sentence prior, pulled from a Facebook status, is the user’s name; Kevin Kemperer. His “doin’ Brittany in the hot tub”, whether true or not, was only known to the user who posted the Facebook status and Brittany.

I have a lot of Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and MySpace friends. I’m gigged out by digital detente. About one percent of my computerized companions are 3D friends. I.e. people I actually call friends in the real world. An additional quarter of the techno-byte buddies are people I’ve met or worked with on occasion; acquaintances. Leaving the rest of the 74 percent of the thousands who Friend, Link, Space and Tweet me as strangers who I only know of by their statuses that stream by in a flood on my laptop screen.

Most of that 74 percentile deluge flowed to me. I know it’s not because of my sapphire eyes, curly locks or sexual preference (damn). I know full well that when I confirm or accept the invites from strangers to become a virtual friend that it’s my work as a director, casting director and/or author that’s being exploited. I’m being networked. I have no qualm or complaint about that. That’s part of this business. It’s a vital survival component for success that anyone in any business should constantly be doing. As long as they befriend business buddies in a professional manner.

If you’re going to network on social internet sites you would do yourself a professional service by creating two profiles. One for your true friends and family. Another to represent your career. Keep your contacts separate and relative for each profile.

I’m often amused and remain amazed about the number of inappropriate “statuses” streaming on my news feeds from the people who are using me as a professional networking connection. Some things are never meant to be witnessed. Like Rush Limbaugh repeatedly jumping naked on a bed.

Below is a sampling from a recent quick glance of actor Facebook & Twitter statuses better left un-texted. If you recognize any of them you can thank me for not revealing your name which I have replaced with “Anonymous”.

“Anonymous fuck my life.”

“Anonymous ain’t gonna go and act a fool and be the lead story on the nigga news? Neva me sucka, I’ll never be your lover, I’D RATHER MAKE YOU SUFFER. You stupid motherfucker.”

“Anonymous thinks there is nothing better than belting out songs that make the neighbors want to complain!”

“Anonymous is burnt as a lobster and totally depressed as hell that CHANDLER has left her forever (crying of course)”

“Anonymous is extremely frustrated…”

“Anonymous’ back is surprisingly tight after yesterdays climbing, and longing for a back massage”

“Anonymous’ headache is gone and I cleaned my own bathroom like a big girl.”

“Anonymous is not good at this hope thing, but desperately needs to know so she can move on with her life. So the question is to act or not? Will either choice help for the better or worse? Or has fate already decided? Really… this is torture!”

“Anonymous has never been so humiliated by someone who calls her his best friend”

“Anonymous is generally displeased.”

“Anonymous is Dear BestBuy, thanks for ruining my fucking day by accusing me of being a criminal. WHY WOULD I TRY TO SHOP LIFT A 5 DOLLAR DVD!?!?!?!?!?!

TMI folks (too much interconnection). O.K. and too much information for me and other people you’re networking with professionally to know. Way too much.

The current constant connection fad of passive aggressive communication via keystrokes is in overdrive. Online social networks can be great tools (of which a later blog on successful exploitation will be forthcoming). But for now; the lesson here is to keep your private thoughts just that. Private. With possible exceptions contained to family relations and reality friends.

If you still doubt about blindly proliferating inappropriate prose to the masses think about this. If you were applying for a school, employment at a Fortune 500 company or keeping in contact with your grandparents via a social internet web site would you advertise to them and the world you were “doing Brittany in the hot tub”? If so, then you’re narcissism challenges that of Paris Hilton’s. Get offline. Get help.

SPECIAL NOTE: You’re probably smarter than the actors above. Be even smarter: Get special discounted, $$ saving, career/marketing-make overs/audition technique coaching (PRIVATE One-on-One) which is now registering with a special installment plan if you enroll for July prior to 6/26. Details at PaulRussell.net

My Best,

Paul

Paul Russell’s career as a casting director, director, acting teacher and former actor has spanned nearly thirty years. He has worked on projects for major film studios, television networks, and Broadway. Paul has taught the business of acting and audition technique at NYU and has spoken at universities including Yale, Temple and the University of the Arts. He writes a column for Back Stage and is the author of ACTING: Make It Your Business – How to Avoid Mistakes and Achieve Success as a Working Actor. For more information, please visit www.PaulRussell.net.

 

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Actor Email Addresses

This week: Actor Email Addresses Used in Addressing Entertainment Professionals

The pre-pubescent use of sexually suggestive, “personality expressive”, childish monikers misused and abused in e-mail addresses utilized for business correspondence has got to stop. Now. If you’ve read my book you know that I stress “this industry is all about image, image, image…” That’s not a mirror mantra for the narcissistic. It’s a reality of the entertainment industry.

Often as I go through the actor mail (hard copy and digital) I groan or sigh heavily in disbelief as I come across actors seeking professional work from a casting person or representation by an agent while utilizing e-mail addresses that are in no way professional.

Below is just a small sampling from the saturation of sophomoric e-mail addresses that I’ve found on actor resumes or spammed to my in-box. In order to spare these fools of flippant font further shame and protect the sillies from spam; the servers (Yahoo, Gmail, Hotmail, etc) have been removed.

dirtyprettyone2000 (The video prequel to nastynaughtyone2001?)

chinkychinese (Does this person have a severe case of self-loathing or are they utilizing  the addy as a dating advert to rice queens?)

AnnoyinActress

swishyfishy

foolishactor (Yes. Your e-mail address proves the message.)

instantactor (Just add bottled water!)

danceweasel (Shirtless, twitching twinks-with-drinks in hand comes to mind.)

puzled.one (If you can’t spell “puzzled”; yes… indeed, you are “puzled”.)

Grahammy_poo (Let’s not even envision to where this double entendre could lead.)

And….

pussylvr

Really? Are these people kidding or are they just insane, myopic morons? This is a business folks. A profession. If the e-mail address in use for your professional correspondence resembles a fifth grader’s ha-ha quotient (i.e. fart jokes and school yard nicknames) then I and others who hire will not take you seriously. Seriously.

For any professional, electronic correspondence an actor’s e-mail address should include the performer’s name or part of it. Such as:

NormaDesmond@whatever.com

N.Desmond@whatever.com

Norma_D@whatever.com

“IngénueForLife”, “MyManMax” or “IamBig” would not be appropriate, professional, e-mail address monikers for Ms. Desmond. (And if you’re wondering who Norma Desmond is… please hand in your acting and/or gay card. Now.)

Keep the silly and inane e-mail addys for friends and family who may be more forgiving than a business contact. Leverage your electronic loony-ness with them. Put a professional, digital image to your e-mail address when addressing professionals. Got it danceweasel? Good.

‘Nuff said.

AMIYB_AmazonRead advice from legendary talent agents,
plus Hollywood & Broadway actors in Paul Russell’s Best-Selling Book ACTING: Make It Your Business!

Paul Russell’s career as a casting director, director, acting teacher and former actor has spanned nearly thirty years. He has worked on projects for major film studios, television networks, and Broadway. Paul has taught the business of acting and audition technique at NYU and has spoken at universities including Yale, Temple and the University of the Arts. He writes a column for Back Stage and is the author of ACTING: Make It Your Business – How to Avoid Mistakes and Achieve Success as a Working Actor. For more information, please visit www.PaulRussell.net.

 

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