What’s NOT Being Said

Paul Russell
Photo Credit: JackMenashe.com

Rational people, unlike Glenn Beck or Rush Limbaugh, refrain from verbally vomiting every thought. In our daily lives behind masked metaphors and parsed phrases we sometimes insinuate unspoken declarations, inquiries, motivations and/or desires. Adept writers seize upon this indirect communication characteristic and place unwritten sub-text behind what is being said. The actor that plays more than the words literally written on the page is the actor that succeeds.

When presented an audition side or a script for a project don’t be lulled into a false sense of security that what is written is only what is being said. It’s your job as an actor to dive into the currents that lie underneath the surface of the words that float upon a page. Ignore that advisory and you’ll drown in a career reminiscent of Gary Coleman.

So how to delve? You ask questions. How? Let’s take a look at material from an audition side of a recent screen project.

The set-up: A couple, now split; have run into each other for the first time since they ended the relationship.

DIANE

You were really good.

ANDY

Thanks…,

DIANE

Who’s decision was it to do that song?

ANDY

Mine. I’m solo now.

DIANE

I know. The group told me.

ANDY

I decided to do something different.

DIANE

I know… Miss me?

ANDY

Uh…, yea, sure…

DIANE

You wanna come over?

ANDY

No.

DIANE

Why not? What’s the matter?

ANDY

You put me out in the street.

DIANE

Andy, I only asked you to leave because you wouldn’t get a job. I couldn’t support you.

——–

Now ask yourself, What’s going on here in this scene? When the echo chamber in the cranium rings with response(s) move to the next paragraph below.

Back? Good. You move fast. O.K. now; let’s see what you’ve gleaned from this slice of a scene. Which of the following just took place? (Vote; then read the rest of the post.)

If you answered: əʌoqɐ əɥʇ ɟo llɐ ˙ə then you’re on the money for what is not being said. (For those of you who can’t read upside down the answer was: ‘E. All of the above’.  I didn’t want your ex cheating… again.)

Writers are not going to write the obvious which if we put the motivations into words the scene would have read as a sophomoric, simplistic snooze-inducing fest:

DIANE

You were really good. Sorry I tossed you out onto the street. But, hey you were a loser. Capital ‘L’. You’ve gotten a lot better and probably could make a living at this now.

ANDY

Thanks.

DIANE

Did you miss me? Because I’ve been missing you and my sex life just hasn’t been the same without you. Wanna fuck?

—–

O.K. So if we wanted to save time this would have been the way to go. But how boring for you and me as audience members to have every statement spelled out for us. (Will Ferrell flick anyone?)

When I teach and direct I am always asking the actor; “What’s not being said?” My asking is not a test. I ask so that the actor begins to think. Now if they come back at me with a direct line quote, well then yes, they’ve failed the test. (O.K. I lied about the test thingy.)

Let’s go back and delve into the original text and see what the writer was not saying directly in dialogue (sub-text in italics):

DIANE

You were really good.

(You’ve proved yourself. You’re not the guy that I used to know who spoke of dreams but couldn’t get anywhere.)

ANDY

Thanks…,

(A compliment? There’s something new for you. I appreciate that. What took you so long to notice and what is that you want?)

DIANE

Who’s decision was it to do that song?

(I really enjoyed what you did. You’re work is growing and yes, I’m intrigued now more than before. You’re independent. A little stand-offish. O.K. I get that because I threw you out.)

ANDY

Mine. I’m solo now.

(I’m no longer co-dependent. And I really don’t feel like talking much more so let’s just keep this short and polite, o.k.?)

DIANE

I know. The group told me.

(I’m sorry. I knew about the song choice. I just wasn’t sure if the others were covering for you by telling me you chose that song because I was here or if you really have made some positive changes in your life.)

—-

It’s your job to find and play the sub-text. If it were written out (as above) the audience would be bored more so than if watching dead grass grow.

This delving into the words (as I discuss extensively in ACTING: Make It Your Business) also applies to song lyrics. Unless of course it’s Tim Rice drivel like:

“Only goes to sho-wa,

Greatest man since No-ah”.

(Oh, Tim.)

So when approaching a scene, song, or monologue ask yourself, What is the writer not saying in the dialogue? What is being said between the lines? What’s the sub-text? What’s the objective? What are the layers I’m to add in playing this? What does this character need and/or want from this situation? It’s then you’ll discover what intent is being said behind the lines of what is actually being spoken. It’s then that you’re viewed as a more successful and intelligent actor. (And not a catch-phrase wonder… “What you talking ‘bout Willis?”)

Add your own sub-text to that last parenthetical.

===

The LAST musical theater Access to Agents for this season will be in April. The seats for the past three seminars have gone in less than a week of initial announcement. For details on this last chance (before the fall)  to present your musical best to a panel of agents visit: http://paulrussell.net/Access_to_Agents.html.

Besos,
Paul

Bookmark and Share

<a href="http://www.stumbleupon.com/submit?url=&title=”&gt;StumbleUpon.com
E-mail This Post to a Friend or Two…

Paul Russell’s career as a casting director, director, acting teacher and former actor has spanned nearly thirty years. He has worked on projects for major film studios, television networks, and Broadway. Paul has taught the business of acting and audition technique at NYU and has spoken at universities including Yale, Temple and the University of the Arts. He writes a column for Back Stage and is the author of ACTING: Make It Your Business – How to Avoid Mistakes and Achieve Success as a Working Actor. For more information, please visit www.PaulRussell.net.

 

Get One-On-One:

Get Work:

Get The Feed:

Classes with Paul Russell Paul's book ACTING: Make It Your Business!

Answers For Actors Feed

Visit Paul @ PaulRussell.net and/or:

Paul Russell on Facebook Paul on Twitter Paul on MySpace

Pilot Season – Landing an Audition

Actors Getting Pilots

Paul Russell

It’s Pilot Season!

Yes it’s that time of year when the entertainment industry is tossed into a tail spin as hundreds of pilots are sought and fought for (and no I’m not talking about the sometimes handsome navigators of cramped cockpits).

Pilots: Small screen’s answer to ‘let’s see what shit sticks to the screen and succeeds.’ An actor getting a pilot audition and then the project getting green-lighted for a ‘go’ is a herculean feat in itself. The actor and project getting broadcast and then possibly picked-up for more than several episodes has as slim a possibility for success as does Glenn Beck winning a Pulitzer Prize for Journalism. The average journeyman actor (with or without representation) getting cast in a pilot is about as possible as Honey Boo Boo playing Ophelia opposite Stewie Griffin’s Lear. But all is not totally impossible or improbable… but let us pray we never have to endure the tiara toddler tripping her tongue upon the Bard.

So how does the journeyman actor get the near-impossible pilot audition and subsequent series?

The Represented Actor:

Your agent submits you for a pilot and then you and your rep hope for the best.

Next!

The Unrepresented Actor:

You doggedly pursue an agent to represent you. Hope to get a meeting. Pray to be signed. Then patiently wait to be submitted on a pilot whereupon you hope for the best.

Next!

I can virtually hear angry actor voices grumbling, ‘Thanks Paul, you’re a lot of f-ing help.” Well, I never promised you a prose garden.

In a discussion I recently had with Jack Menashe, the prior President of Independent Artists Agency who is also one of the four agents who gives candid actor career advice in ACTING: Make It Your Business, I asked Menashe for insightful measures for his clients and the non-represented actor to get into the Fort Knox of screen employ that is pilot season.

“Actors have to understand that getting an audition for a pilot is not going to happen because the actor has an agent or just a picture, resume and a smile,” Menashe began. “Casting directors who work on television pilots are extremely picky about who gets in because the casting director’s reputation is on the line with the producer.”

I pushed Menashe on then how best to get past the picky gate-keepers like myself.

“Two ways,” Menashe offered. “The unrepresented actor would do him or herself a huge service by going to paid auditions. But not the typical run-of-the-mill paid auditions. During pilot season they should be going to places that screen the actors first before those actors are allowed to meet with talent agents and casting directors who work on television projects. L.A. and New York are loaded with them. Years ago when I had first launched Independent Artists, I discovered a high caliber of talent had channeled into this resource.”

Signing those exceptional actors Menashe then prodded casting directors to seeing the newly minted clients for pilots. But he was not alone in his championing of actors. Menashe spoke of how a casting director assisted both him and an actor to getting quickly into pilot and film auditions.

“A casting director took me to a show that included an actor who she had seen the night prior at one of your seminars (Paul Russell’s Studies for Actors).  He was incredible.  I signed him and his first year with me he booked his first major supporting feature film role, his first television pilot, several low-budget features and theater gigs.”

Having struck success once, Menashe went back to the source of finding untapped talent.

“In the years to come, I would sign several actors through these venues,” Menashe continued, “all of whom have landed notable work in film, television and theater.”

But success sometimes is soured.

“Unfortunately some of the actors,” Menashe continued, “who are screened by the staff of these audition venues are far from what I and my colleagues are looking for either as talent or as business-people, or in many cases both.”

And oh how true that is. As I’ve witnessed in my own Access to Agents and similar seminars I attend actors can pay out precious paper repeatedly to acting studios but if the actors doesn’t have the talent to match their deep pockets there’s no way in hell they’ll move forward. Well, unless they happen to land a reality TV gig. But when eating iguana intestines on a deserted island becomes the new Bard of our time, then it’s time for all actors to pack-up their make-up kits and call it a day.

Menashe also brought up another path to pilots. One not so much as immediate but none-the-less a route well traveled by others that brought lasting rewards: comedy clubs.

“If an actor has a great sense of humor,” Menashe suggested, “along with a unique comic perspective then he or she as an actor needs to get on stage at comedy clubs. Do the open mic nights. Push into the industry evenings. Casting directors for half-hour comedies mine comedy clubs. That’s how many unknown actors suddenly land a TV show.”

“You mean the actors that bum-fart Kansas or Lodi, New Jersey never heard of?” I added.

“Exactly,” Menashe responded. “It’s not the quickest route but it gets you in front of the major players of gate-keeping for TV.”

Represented or not, an actor should be heeding Menashe’s words by taking an active attack in seeking to book on-camera work for pilot season. One such avenue is to be an informed actor.

ACTING: Make It Your Business

If, as you began this read, were looking for a quick, sure-fire Rubik’s Cube simplistic solution to getting an audition for a pilot then you really don’t understand this business. If angered or frustrated by that statement you need reconsideration for your chosen profession. Nothing comes easily for anyone on either side of the audition table. If you have read the chapters on film and pilot auditions in ACTING: Make It Your Business; then you’re several steps ahead of those who haven’t picked up that tome dedicated to advancing an actor’s career.

My Best,
Paul

AMIYB_AmazonRead advice from legendary talent agents,
plus Hollywood & Broadway actors in Paul Russell’s Best-Selling Book ACTING: Make It Your Business!

Paul Russell’s career as a casting director, director, acting teacher and former actor has spanned nearly thirty years. He has worked on projects for major film studios, television networks, and Broadway. Paul has taught the business of acting and audition technique at NYU and has spoken at universities including Yale, Temple and the University of the Arts. He writes a column for Back Stage and is the author of ACTING: Make It Your Business – How to Avoid Mistakes and Achieve Success as a Working Actor. For more information, please visit www.PaulRussell.net.

Get One-On-One:

Get Work:

Get The Feed:

Classes with Paul Russell Paul's book ACTING: Make It Your Business!

Answers For Actors Feed

Visit Paul @ PaulRussell.net and/or:

Paul Russell on Facebook Paul on Twitter Paul on MySpace

Warped Reality

This Week: Actors Pretending to Be Real People Pretending Not Be Actors

Reality doesn’t exist.

31. That’s the number of breakdowns via Breakdown Services released to talent agents in the past twelve months for reality programming seeking actors as ‘real’ people. It’s been no industry secret that those ‘real people’ you see on Survivor, Big Brother and similar non-episodic programming that clog our cable providers have not been filled solely with people pulled from the local mall but sweetened with actors cast in sessions put together via submissions from talent agencies. If this is news to you; welcome to reality.

Among the ‘real’ shows revealed in my breakdown search seeking ‘real people’ (who just happen to have real talent agents) the projects included:

– An untitled, reality, fashion show seeking ‘real’ photographers who by coincidence are also actors. (Faux-cameras need not apply.)

– A non-union, major cable, untitled, reality show looking to tear apart BFFs – who happen to be actors – as they fight for the affections of one man. (Gives new meaning to ‘BFF’; bitch fist-fights.)

Then there was one reality program seeking real lawyers who by chance are also actors. (There’s an infinity mirror gone hell-ish. Representation with representation.)

My personal fav reality show breakdown was one that was searching for a mugger. Yes, it would seem that the streets of New York, LA and Chicago are not filled with honest deviants of battery so the producers needed to look elsewhere for true assault; an actor to be a thug but not declare that they are a thespian. The mugger character description read: ‘must be rough/scruffy looking’. That could be any actor who has just emerged dazed and dreary from a week of tech.

What’s the point Paul’ you may be asking? None. O.K. well yes I have one or I wouldn’t be working my fingers as the winter winds howl outside my window.

When reality programming first became the rage of the early-aughts of the 2000’s actors themselves got enraged. Employment was being usurped as television execs found a cheaper form or programming. Now those jobs are coming back to the actors. But nearly all are non-union as so too must be the actors (if they’re honest). And unless a winner for whatever contest is being held there remains no money. Only exposure.

The producers exploit the cheaper-to-‘hire’-talent at mostly free wages and the union actors remain on the sidelines, again, as the number of small-screen, union jobs, diminish. Worse yet; union or not, actors are no longer competing for employ-slash-exposure among the overwhelming volume of their peers but now have to go up against civilians as well. Is it no wonder that some actors scream silently in their cranium about lack of opportunity, Who do I have to fuck to be noticed on YouTube? (Try a sports icon. If you’re desperate; a Governor or Senator.)

And then there’s the misguided thought of the ‘actors’ or civilians with acting aspirations who land a reality show gig gloating, ‘This is gonna make me!’ Uhmmm… not for very long my high-def  dilettantes. More than likely you’ll be forgotten as the next male enhancement commercial flails before our eyes. Reality might be a short-cut to extreme exposure but so far the statistics on long term endurance remains doubtful. William Hung anyone?

The most recent news on Mr. Hung’s official web site was from June 10, 2008. He was the highlighted guest of an international Mahjong Tournament in Hong Kong. Oh, can his star on the Hollywood walk-of-fame be far behind?

What can actors do to cauterize the wounds of lost employ to ‘reality’? Union actors with activist ambitions would do themselves and their membership brethren well by involving themselves on union committees which negotiate contracts. Non-union actors would better serve their long-term interests and that of their peers by reducing participation and consumption of reality programing. Pollyanna? Yes. Realistic solutions? No. But one answer does not solve a host of problems. And this current deluge of ‘reality’ on TV was brought upon by multiples of economic and contractual tsunamis.

We, the audience, have only ourselves to blame for encouraging the growing shrinkage of paid employ on television. And so now actors willingly step up to fill that void by bartering the lack of a paycheck in exchange for exposure.

So next time when sitting in your Hell’s Kitchen studio that’s not a million dollar listing –with your average Joe, big brother or better half — to tune-in to see if America’s got talent and you’re flipping out over the next best thing that has the it factor remember moving up from the real world to the surreal life is a shark tank of anything for love that in the end is an amazing race where there is only one survivor and all others are the biggest loser.

(Yes, I know… but I couldn’t resist temptation of that last paragraph. And there are 17 of them in there by-the-by. 17 pieces of reality chipping away at opportunities for actors getting paid to create fantasy.)

My Best,
Paul

P.S. The February Access to Agents (Musical Theater version) is now registering. The most recent series got three actors signed with agencies plus several other actors received additional call-backs and agent meetings. Only 10 participants per series. Info Here

Bookmark and Share

 

E-mail This Post to a Friend or Two…

Paul Russell’s career as a casting director, director, acting teacher and former actor has spanned nearly thirty years. He has worked on projects for major film studios, television networks, and Broadway. Paul has taught the business of acting and audition technique at NYU and has spoken at universities including Yale, Temple and the University of the Arts. He writes a column for Back Stage and is the author of ACTING: Make It Your Business – How to Avoid Mistakes and Achieve Success as a Working Actor. For more information, please visit www.PaulRussell.net.

Get One-On-One:

Get Work:

Get The Feed:

Classes with Paul Russell Paul's book ACTING: Make It Your Business!

Answers For Actors Feed

Visit Paul @ PaulRussell.net and/or:

Paul Russell on Facebook Paul on Twitter Paul on MySpace

The Casting Couch – Real & Virtual Foreplay

A reader recently reached out to me asking for guidance on a taboo subject that I idealistically would like to believe had perished coitus interruptus long ago. Banished to the age of film noir. Relegated to the sovereignty of sex films. What is it? The casting couch. The practice of demanding sexual favors in return for casting a performer in a theatrical, film, TV production, etc. A coy colloquialism in reference to the office couch of a casting director, director, producer talent rep. or any entertainment industry gate-keeper. (You won’t find this at your local Ikea.)

The reader’s detailing of requested debauchery from a professional began:

“I’m an actor and model based in NY. I find myself on the casting couch being propositioned over and over again. I recently made a friend request [on Facebook] to a manager with, ‘How r u? I’m [name withheld].’ That led them to believe that I was interested in them sexually and when I turned down their advances (because this is not what I am about) they got mad and said that I was leading them on.”

O.K. let’s stop here first.

Not knowing either individual I cannot make a fully informed response. I have no idea if the manager is reputable or one of the many cockroach-like “I’m a play-ah in da game” shysters with a tiny cell phone and an enormous ego. (Far too many of these in our business.) I also don’t know if the reader has in his Facebook profile; pictures and information that would cause a visitor to his page to make assumptions of amorous availability. But there are some red flags in the actor’s accounting of unwanted accosting.

Mistakes were made. On both side of the accept/ignore button of Facebook friendship. The reader erred by not stating immediately his intent of the friend request. The manager fouled by assuming any contact is fair game for foreplay. First let’s address the actor; being that he initiated the dialogue between himself and the manager.

The actor stated “I find myself on the casting couch being propositioned over and over again.” If this history is true then he should have known one of two things. First; he’s going to have this happen to him (unfortunately) again if the past persists in repeating itself. We can not change the behavior of those around us. We can only prescribe our own choices and actions.

Second; if the actor’s professional history routinely replicates then maybe he should be looking at his own actions (or inactions) which may be inadvertently causing others to believe him to be a viable option for their romantic advances. I am not doing a blame-the-victim here. My viewpoint is far from that potential mistaken assumption of some who read this.

I question why this continues to happen in this man’s life. What are the influences apart from the people he encounters who know not professional and personal boundaries? Is he an affable guy with a killer smile? Does he possess an infectious, inviting charm that others mistake as a dinner bell being rung for random randiness? Or is he just too damn hot-n-sexy for the sidewalk that passers-by actually see him before crashing into while texting (a.k.a. crexting… you heard that one here first).

Whatever the case; his having knowledge of the past should have made him cautious of contacting a stranger (i.e. the manager) for a friend request. Also the person he was reaching out to did not know why the actor was making the connection. Reason of motivation should have been made clear from the start. But the actor erred and only after he got an inappropriate response did the actor inform the person he contacted with a friend request his true desire for doing so:

“I’m looking to further my career but not in this way. I asked [the manager], ‘If I was hitting on you then you would be interested but since I hit you up on professional business matters–now you’re not. Am I right?’”

“Professional business matters” that key phrase was missing from the actor’s earlier address to the manager; the “How r u? I’m [name withheld].” Had the actor first written, “Hello. I’m [name withheld]. I’m seeking representation….” then this treatise probably would never have been typed.

Now; the manager.

Again I do not know of this person’s position in our industry. The actor claimed the manager was “legit” but what may be viewed as “legit” by an actor may be from my side of the audition table someone with little credibility who is posing and pretending. If opposite of such — someone of experience with peer respectability — the allegation is deeply disturbing if the actor’s accounting is accurate. Either way – posing or legit — the manager should have checked him or herself by checking out the actor’s online profile before ignorantly responding to the friend request. If the word “actor” appeared anywhere on the actor’s page the manger had two choices. First; ignore. The friend request was unsolicited coming from a stranger (i.e. the actor). Second; inquire of the requester reason for the outreach.

I am not dismissing the actor’s claim. I do believe he has encountered unwanted requests for quid-pro-quo romantic entanglements during his career. Invitations to the antiquated and abusive casting couch, sadly, still exist. And it is sexual harassment. Plain and simple. Having been sexually harassed myself by a casting director I worked for long ago (the story is in ACTING: Make It Your Business) I know what it is like to be a passing interest of passion by someone who is focused more on seeking an immediate conquest than a establishing a long-term commitment.

Uninvited, continual flirtation by any auditor to an actor in any setting is understandably verboten. That same rules applies in reverse. I once received repeated letters of libidinous intent from an actor asking me for a more “personal relationship”. I answered suggesting that I would correspond with him regarding advice pertaining to business only. Dinner, movies and romance were not on my agenda. He pushed back harder his desire for passion. That left me with a residue of creepiness.

If you encounter unwanted solicitations for sex for professional advancement in return do not be shy about bringing to light the unprofessional behavior encountered. To avoid a situation similar to that which sparked this story communicate clearly your intent of outreach. Whether that contact is to network, get a job, or to be friends and nothing more.

The casting couch has no place in our industry except as a comfortable reception divan for anxious actors patiently awaiting their legitimate audition. Those who wish to exploit sexual favor for career progression often develop an unseemly reputation that trumps professionalism and outlasts the momentary passionate conquest.

Next.

My Best,
Paul

AMIYB_AmazonRead advice from legendary talent agents,
plus Hollywood & Broadway actors in Paul Russell’s Best-Selling Book ACTING: Make It Your Business!

Paul Russell’s career as a casting director, director, acting teacher and former actor has spanned nearly thirty years. He has worked on projects for major film studios, television networks, and Broadway. Paul has taught the business of acting and audition technique at NYU and has spoken at universities including Yale, Temple and the University of the Arts. He writes a column for Back Stage and is the author of ACTING: Make It Your Business – How to Avoid Mistakes and Achieve Success as a Working Actor. For more information, please visit www.PaulRussell.net.

 

Get One-On-One:

Get Work:

Get The Feed:

Classes with Paul Russell Paul's book ACTING: Make It Your Business!

Answers For Actors Feed

Visit Paul @ PaulRussell.net and/or:

Paul Russell on Facebook Paul on Twitter Paul on MySpace

Accents at Auditions – Use ’em or lose ’em?

This week: “Zee play is zee-How you say? -Is zee thing, yes?”

A reader  — long ago when Susan Boyle was “the it girl” —  inquired:

“Paul how important is it to use an accent at auditions?”

A vague, but important inquiry. So let’s get specific here on a solution. There are several audition scenarios for which I can foresee the utilization or avoidance of an accent.

Auditioning for a Specific Role:

You’ve been given sides. The breakdown for the role reads that the character is French. What do you do about an accent?

First there is a question you must ask of yourself and/or the person who has provided you the material:

“Is an accent required for the audition?”

Why ask this?

1. The auditors may want you to be more focused on the story telling in the scene than your ability at linguistic legitimacy. An accent may be secondary. Stage and screen projects with budgets for a dialect coach will have someone to properly discipline your dialect dexterity.

2. If every role in the project is of the same accented heritage the director may have opted to have all actors perform the piece without the regional dialect associated to the characters.

3. The accent, for the auditors, may be just as important as the story-telling. If so, make sure you ask the person presenting you the audition for dialect specificity. Lost on that? If you’re told to do an English accent what kind would you present? Cockney? RP? Central London? Welsh? Mid-lands? Know before you go what derivation of pronunciation you’re to show.

A General Audition:

There are times when you’ll have auditions in your career for which there is no project of employ; academic entry, talent reps, paid auditions, getting-to-know-you as an actor and similar. You may have chosen a piece (monologue or scene) that can be associated with a dialect. You’d be wise to focus on the story telling than to bring an accent into the audition. Why? Because you’re being viewed in a general audition for your ability to bring character and thru-lines to life. You’re not there to show how well you can mimic sounds. Leave that, for the moment, to parrots and talking heads on cable news.

If you choose — in a general audition — to forgo a dialect. Let the person(s) viewing you know that you have made a conscious decision to focus on story telling and not selling a sound.

Overall:

When requested to provide an accent at the audition make sure that you’re presenting one that is either learnt from a credible dialect coach or at least from one of the many available dialect CDs. The worst thing an actor can do is present a self-taught, foreign-to-them dialect acquired without training. The most bastardized of regional tongues are the Queen’s English and American Southern. I and my colleagues have heard one-too-many substandard “southern accents”. And what you may think is southern (inadvertently sounding like a drunken Texan) doesn’t pass for southwestern Virginia Appalachia or coastal South Carolina. A one-size fits-all southern accent does not work. This advisory holds true for all regional dialects of French, English, Spanish, what-ever origin of tongue.

Whenever you audition for a role in which an accent is associated always ask, “Is an accent required for the audition?”  If you don’t ask, they won’t tell.

Arm yourself with knowledge of accents (type & usage) before going in front of auditors. That’s the best way to apply accents at auditions.

My Best,
Paul

AMIYB_AmazonRead advice from legendary talent agents,
plus Hollywood & Broadway actors in Paul Russell’s Best-Selling Book ACTING: Make It Your Business!

Paul Russell’s career as a casting director, director, acting teacher and former actor has spanned nearly thirty years. He has worked on projects for major film studios, television networks, and Broadway. Paul has taught the business of acting and audition technique at NYU and has spoken at universities including Yale, Temple and the University of the Arts. He writes a column for Back Stage and is the author of ACTING: Make It Your Business – How to Avoid Mistakes and Achieve Success as a Working Actor. For more information, please visit www.PaulRussell.net.

 

Get One-On-One:

Get New Insights:

Get The Feed:

Classes with Paul Russell Paul's book ACTING: Make It Your Business!

Answers For Actors Feed

Visit Paul @ PaulRussell.net and/or:

Paul Russell on Facebook Paul on Twitter Paul on MySpace